H.P. Lovecraft

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Gibby
 
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Postby Gibby » Sat Nov 08, 2008 4:22 pm

I think anything post 40's would lose of a lot of the atmosphere. Dunno why...

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Rook
 
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Postby Rook » Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:24 pm

So I borrowed the first Omnibus from NightShade recently, and before I'd even finished reading my first story ("At The Mountains of Madness") I found myself buying Necronomicon: The Best Weird Tales of H.P. Lovecraft. It seems that it has the entire Cthulu Mythos cycle, as well as all the longer novella-esque things. Just read "Dagon", which was OK, if a bit lightweight, not surprisingly considering how early it is.

Looking forward to ploughing through these...

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Scrappy
 
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Postby Scrappy » Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:50 pm

So I bought Call of Cthulu and other stories. Yet to read it but I really am looking forward to it. After buying Arkham Horror I've decided I need to have a little read of one of his books.

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Scrappy
 
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Postby Scrappy » Fri Jan 28, 2011 2:17 pm

Holy shit, I just read "The statement of Randolf Carter" and was actually scared. The first time a book has ever done that to me.

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NightShade
 
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Postby NightShade » Fri Jan 28, 2011 4:03 pm

Is that the swamp/tomb one? Think that was the first Lovecraft story I ever read, tis good. I've found no writer has ever be able to express true fear and horror to a reader like Lovecraft did. The creation of real atmospheres and environments with an unnerving ability to understand what makes people truly scared creates some powerful writing when he gets it spot on.

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Adam
 
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Postby Adam » Fri Jan 28, 2011 6:50 pm

Sigur Ros wrote:Holy shit, I just read "The statement of Randolf Carter" and was actually scared. The first time a book has ever done that to me.


I think it's my favourite story of his. The end is utterly chilling.
www.thelineofbestfit.com

p.s. - I am wanking as I write this

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Me
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Postby Me » Mon Apr 04, 2011 9:35 pm

I've just picked up Call of Cuthulu and other weird stories on kindle. Read Dagon, Randolf Carter and I'm half way through Arthur Jermyn. Alright so far, nothings really gripped me yet, I think due to the brevity of the stories. I'm liking Arthur Jermyn best so far though although I had higher hopes for Dagon.

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Me
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Postby Me » Wed Apr 13, 2011 10:40 pm

Bought the leather bound Necronomicon collection with illustrations book, fucking massive. Rats in the Walls and Hound are rather good. Reading a story or two in bed at night

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Solidarity Reg
 
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Postby Solidarity Reg » Wed Jul 27, 2011 10:39 pm

Yeah that's the book I have and it's wonderful.

My gf lent me The Great God Pan, which was apparently a big inspiration on Lovecraft's work, as well as other horror writers. It's really quite good.

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Adam
 
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Postby Adam » Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:30 am

Adam wrote:
Sigur Ros wrote:Holy shit, I just read "The statement of Randolf Carter" and was actually scared. The first time a book has ever done that to me.


I think it's my favourite story of his. The end is utterly chilling.


When I wrote this I was actually talking about the one in the sea, when the underwater fish monster kingdom rises out of the water.


Thought I'd be make it clear when I was reading Lovecraft again the other day and suddenly went "OH. NO. I WAS WRONG ON THE INTERNET."
www.thelineofbestfit.com

p.s. - I am wanking as I write this

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Me
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Postby Me » Thu Jul 28, 2011 10:36 am

I must admit, when I first read that I was confused how a monster saying "HE'S ALREADY DEAD, MWHAAAAAA" through a telephone was in anyway chilling, especially when the story made it clear he was already dead about 4 pages back.

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Adam
 
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Postby Adam » Thu Jul 28, 2011 10:53 am

Exactly, I realised my error immediately and knew that it must be rectified.
www.thelineofbestfit.com

p.s. - I am wanking as I write this

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Me
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Postby Me » Thu Jul 28, 2011 10:58 am

And I for one, congratulate you.

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Snowy
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Postby Snowy » Mon Aug 01, 2011 9:34 am

Dreams in the Witch House is one of my personal favourites, along with The Horror in the Museum.
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RCHD wrote:Snowy is my favourite. He's a metal God.

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Stormbringer
 
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Re: H.P. Lovecraft

Postby Stormbringer » Thu May 05, 2016 11:05 pm

BOOM!

Sorry I missed this thread! Looks like it started right after I left too! It's a shame KingCrab seems to have left the forum (six years ago, apparently). Well, should he ever come back, I'll write my thoughts here for him to find.

My first encounter with H.P. Lovecraft was in the October of 2004, a good few months after I had first joined PWF. I was sick one day, lying in bed with the cold or something, and utterly bored. A few years prior, a high school friend had sent me a copy of Lovecraft's most well-known tales, collected in one volume, which he had bought on a visit to America. I had put the book on my shelf and (like so many others) never read it. On that day in 2004, I picked it up and started reading the first tale in the collection -- "The Outsider".

The first lines of that story go as follows:

"Unhappy is he to whom the memories of childhood bring only fear and sadness. Wretched is he who looks back upon lone hours in vast and dismal chambers with brown hangings and maddening rows of antique books, or upon awed watches in twilight groves of grotesque, gigantic, and vine-encumbered trees that silently wave twisted branches far aloft. Such a lot the gods gave to me - to me, the dazed, the disappointed; the barren, the broken..."

Well, from that point on, I was utterly hooked. The ending left my mind reeling in a state of total awe. I went on and read all the other stories in the book, then over the next four years bought every single book by or about Lovecraft I could find. I became utterly obsessed with the man, his ideas, his over-sensitive personality and of course his writings, to what I would now regard as an completely insane degree!

After I left this forum in 2008, I threw away all my Lovecraft books and never looked back. Later, once I had got married and regained some sanity points, I bought the two leatherbound volumes by Gollancz, NECRONOMICON and ELDTRICH TALES, which between them contain most of his work.

Today, I still admire the man's evocative writing style and powerful imagination, though the lure of the Cthluhu Mythos has definitely lost its grip on me and I am nowhere near as into him as I was a decade ago.

My favourite tale? Probably The Call of Cthulhu. It is a classic.
Bear welcome in your eye, your hand, your tongue.
Look like th' innocent flower, but be the serpent under ’t.

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